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No One Goes Away from Jesus Unchanged – As Seen in a Christmas Commercial

December 25, 2015

Пластиковые карточкиThe video below is a Coca-Cola commercial from several years ago that takes up the Christmas theme of the star of Christmas.

Let us review the impact that the star of Christmas had on the wise men, the Magi.

  1. The star moved them to seek meaning outside themselves; it made them look out and up.
  2. The star called them beyond what was familiar in their own country and world and expanded their horizons toward Christ and His kingdom.
  3. The star summoned them to seek Christ, and when they found Him, to worship Him.
  4. The star drew them to be generous to a poor family in Bethlehem; they made sacrifices as they lay costly gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh before the Lord.
  5. The star roused them to conversion; they “returned to their country by another route,” following the straight and narrow path rather than the wide and destructive one.

Yes, no one encounters Jesus Christ and goes away unchanged. A blind man went away able to see, the deaf to hear, the lame to walk. The hungry went away satisfied, the ignorant instructed, the guilty forgiven, sinners converted.

The call of the nations to change and to new life began with a star. The light of the star opens the way to the Light of World, Jesus. The star of my life is Jesus.

In the commercial below we see Santa (a name that means “Holy One”) sending forth a star, one that touches them and radiates a light that transforms them.

  1. A woman sees the light of that star and is able to forgive her husband and be reconciled with him.
  2. A young soccer player sees the light of that star, surrenders his pride, and steps aside to let another share in and get a shot at glory.
  3. A young girl sees the light of that star and, forsaking some of her own beauty, seeks to beautify a public park for others.
  4. A museum guard sees the light of that star and shows mercy to the guard dog with him (this was a silly one).
  5. A father sees the light of that star and permits his son a moment of growth.

Yes, there is something about that star that changes everyone who looks at it. They become more forgiving, more gracious, more aware of others, more connected to others, more loving. The light of the star, and the light of the world, is Jesus. His light is meant to have that same effect and more besides.

In the background of the commercial an old Elvis song plays: “Wise men say only fools rush in. But I can’t help falling in love with you. Shall I stay, would it be a sin? If I can’t help falling in love with you.”

Of course the love that is symbolized by the star is not the romantic love of the song but the brotherly and agape love that Christ gives. Like the Magi who found Christ by the star, no one sees the star of Jesus and encounters Him and then goes away unchanged. Indeed, if we authentically encounter Christ, we are equipped to love, just as the people in this commercial are. We are equipped to forgive, to bring healing, to help others find strength and glory in the truth, and to come to full maturity in Christ. A person who knows Jesus and has encountered Him cannot help loving others, not in some merely sentimental way, but with a strong and vigorous love rooted in the truth. This is the same love that Jesus has for us all.

At the end of the commercial there is an admonition in Spanish that translates as follows: “Give the world the best of you.” The best of me is Jesus.

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Comments (2)

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  1. Donna L. says:

    Amen! Thanks for that! Merry Christmas, Monsignor!

  2. Rene L says:

    This is not about the commercial. I noticed the OSV newspaper posted your reply to an inquirer’s question about the star in a priest’s homily being a gaseous light and not an actual star. You allege to Cornelius de Lapide SI’s interpretation to scripture as literal or too close a reading of the text. I am sure you may be aware of St Thomas Aquinas Summa Theologiae Tertia Pars in the Manifestation of the Christ as being by a star not in the celestial heavens. And he comes up with some reasonable observations and citations from St Augustine and even Pope Leo. It seemed as a rational and faith explanation of theological mystery in the history of revelation…